Product Spec Sheet

ElementBrandProduct Name
ManufacturersSEFAR
Facade systemSCHÜCO
CeilingGeipel
Lamination of glass with SefarGlassbel
Terrazzo flooringMurlina
GlazingSaint-Gobain Glass HQ

Product Spec Sheet
Manufacturers
by SEFAR
Facade system
by SCHÜCO
Ceiling
by Geipel
Lamination of glass with Sefar
Terrazzo flooring
by Murlina

Keflavik Airport Extension

Andersen & Sigurdsson Architects as Architects

In the spring of 2010 the Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland erupted, having a devastating effect on the country. Air traffic in Europe came to a standstill and as a result Iceland became increasingly isolated. Eyjafjallajökull was on everyone's lips, both east and west of the Atlantic, but the eruption turned out to have great promotional value for Iceland. When air traffic recommenced in Europe, tourists flooded to Iceland to experience the exceptional nature and culture of the country. With a population of only 330,000, the years after the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull saw a large number of tourists travelling to Iceland. The amount of passengers traveling through the airport has increased with 30-40% per year, and in 2015 almost 5 million passengers traveled through the terminal.


Keflavik Airport terminal opened in 1986, then 23,000m2. Since then the terminal has extended several times, and with the massive increase in the number of tourists traveling through the airport there is a continuous need to expand the terminal fast. Therefore the airport is now extending with a 4.700 m2 busgate terminal, which will service passengers to and from the aircrafts by remote stands. By limiting the size of the construction and the amount of service for the passengers one can speed up the building process and ensure maximum performance of the building in terms of passenger flow. The building programme is complex as it has to service both Schengen and non-Schengen passengers and also passengers of so-called third countries simultaneously.Therefore the infrastructure has to have a great degree of flexibility.


The building is simple in its structure, consisting of a steel frame, prefabricated concrete floor slabs and a glass facade. The simplicity in the building structure was necessary in order to allow for the airport to be fully operationalduringthe construction.


Materials and colour schemes are inspired by Icelandic nature. The floors are made of black terrazzo and smoked oak. The interior glass walls are inspired by Icelandic autumn colours that can be found around the Thingvellir National Park.


Extensive glass facades allow travellers to engage in the activities on apron as well as having spectacular views to the surrounding vast landscape and mountains. Travellers are exposed to the ever changing Icelandic weather conditions. In the wintertime one can experience the special Nordic light, aurora borealis, and in the summertime the building will be bathed in daylight all day long.


Woven aluminium mesh in natural colours is laminated into the exterior glass façade, acting as a sunscreen and having a positive effect on the indoor climate. This provides improved thermal performance, reduces glare and adds a unique depth in the texture of the façade. It also reduces heat loading and light transmission, potentially saving the building owners capital expenses in relation to heating, ventilation, and air conditioning.


Keflavik Airport Extension

Teikn architects as Architects

In the spring of 2010 the Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland erupted, having a devastating effect on the country. Air traffic in Europe came to a standstill and as a result Iceland became increasingly isolated. Eyjafjallajökull was on everyone’s lips, both east and west of the Atlantic, but the eruption turned out to have great promotional value for Iceland. When air traffic recommenced in Europe, tourists flooded to Iceland to experience the exceptional nature and culture of the country. With a population of only 330,000, the years after the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull saw a large number of tourists travelling to Iceland. The amount of passengers traveling through the airport has increased with 30-40% per year, and in 2015 almost 5 million passengers traveled through the terminal.


Keflavik Airport terminal opened in 1986, then 23,000m2. Since then the terminal has extended several times, and with the massive increase in the number of tourists traveling through the airport there is a continuous need to expand the terminal fast. Therefore the airport is now extending with a 4.700 m2 busgate terminal, which will service passengers to and from the aircrafts by remote stands. By limiting the size of the construction and the amount of service for the passengers one can speed up the building process and ensure maximum performance of the building in terms of passenger flow. The building programme is complex as it has to service both Schengen and non-Schengen passengers and also passengers of so-called third countries simultaneously. Therefore the infrastructure has to have a great degree of flexibility.


The building is simple in its structure, consisting of a steel frame, prefabricated concrete floor slabs and a glass facade. Materials and color schemes are inspired by Icelandic nature, black terrazzo floors, smoked oak, and glass walls in Icelandic autumn colors. Woven aluminum mesh from Sefar AG in natural colours is laminated into the exterior glass façade, acting as a sunscreen and having a positive effect on the indoor climate. This provides improved thermal performance, reduces glare and adds a unique depth in the texture of the façade. It also reduces heat loading and light transmission, potentially saving the building owners capital expenses in relation to heating, ventilation, and air conditioning.


Airport Keflavik

SEFAR as Manufacturers

Inspired by Icelandic nature, black terrazzo floors, smoked oak and glass walls in Icelandic autumn colours define the bus gate terminal building at this rapidly expanding airport in Keflavik.


The terminal building is constructed with a steel floor, prefabricated concrete floor and a glass facade that incorporates SEFAR Architecture VISION. SEFAR’s woven aluminium coated and copper printed fabric is laminated into the exterior glazing, creating a sunscreen that in turns helps to regulate the interior climate, improving thermal performance, reducing glare and adding a unique depth and texture to the facade.


More from the Manufacturer:


In 2010 the Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland erupted and Iceland became increasingly isolated. But the eruption turned out to have great promotional value for Iceland. The years after the eruption, the amount of visitors rapidly increased up to almost 5 million passengers per year in 2015 through the Keflavik Airport. The original Airport terminal opened in 1986 with 23’000 m2 and has expanded in size several times. Now it’s expanding again with a 4’700 m2 modern bus gate terminal, which will service passengers to and from the aircraft by remote stands.


Materials and color schemes are inspired by Icelandic nature, black terrazzo floors, smoked oak, and glass walls in Icelandic autumn colors. The bus gate terminal building consists of a steel frame, prefabricated concrete floor with a glass facade, featuring SEFAR® Architecture VISION. This woven Aluminum coated and Copper printed fabric is laminated into the exterior glass facade, acting as a sunscreen and having a positive effect on the indoor climate. This provides improved thermal performance, reduces glare and adds a unique depth in the texture of the facade. It also reduces heat loading and light transmission, potentially saving the building owners capital expenses in relation to heating, ventilation, and air conditioning.

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