MOH Meret Oppenheim Hochhaus

MOH Meret Oppenheim Hochhaus

Architect
Herzog & de Meuron
Location
Basel, Switzerland | View Map
Project Year
2019
Category
Offices

Shops

Apartments
Stories By
WSDG

Herzog & de Meuron
Photo Credit: Yohan Zerdoun
Product Spec Sheet

ElementBrandProduct Name
ManufacturersJakob AG
Fire Gates / woodJos. Berchtold AG
Flooring / ParkettAGB Bodenbeläge AG
Precast concreteArnet Elementbau AG
Partion WallsBlaser AG
Paint WorkChiaravalle Maleratelier AG

Product Spec Sheet
Manufacturers
Fire Gates / wood
Flooring / Parkett
Precast concrete
Partion Walls

WSDG Delivers Three Floors of Acoustically Perfected Studios for Swiss National Broadcaster SRF

WSDG as Other

Global architectural acoustic consulting and design firm WSDG have announced the completion of work on Studio Basel, the brand new production facility located in the Meret Oppenheim high-rise (MOH) for Swiss national radio and TV broadcaster SRF. The building was constructed by Basel architectural firm Herzog & de Meuron with three floors of production suites and open-office areas, all of which have been engineered by WSDG to ensure acoustically precise working areas for SRF’s wide variety of broadcast and recorded programming.

 

The upgraded facilities include two live radio drama rooms, two smaller recording rooms, a control room, auditorium, and more than a dozen radio production rooms. The WSDG team, led by WSDG Project Engineer Robi Hersberger, worked in conjunction with renowned Basel architects Diener & Diener, who handled the interior buildout, and TPC (a division of SRF), which handled the A/V systems integration. “We developed an acoustical treatment concept that worked for as many rooms in the project as possible,” said Hersberger. “The concept’s core was to give each room very efficient absorptive ceilings.”

 

“With these in place, different types of wall panels can then be used to achieve the remaining necessary treatment. This not only helped to keep costs down, but also allows for maximum flexibility for the spaces in the future. What was challenging however was determining how to implement this with equal effectiveness in rooms that have differing specifications.”

 

Hersberger relied on WSDG go-to tools such as the CATT-Acoustic simulation platform and the R&D Team ABEC3 acoustic boundary element calculator to digitally simulate and plan out the different rooms. This ensured that they would have consistently high-quality acoustics throughout while addressing the different production needs required by each.

 

Studio Basel’s two live radio drama rooms required the highest-quality room acoustics and flexibility to suit the breadth of SRF’s programming needs. The largest of these two rooms is designed to accommodate a variety of live drama scenarios with multiple actors  and is capable of playing host to numerous fictional indoor environments. A flexible setup of mobile panels, gobos, and curtains provides a variety of ambiances. The smaller radio drama room is acoustically dry with no reflections whatsoever from the wall or ceiling, allowing it to be used for drama settings that take place in outdoor environments.

 

Hersberger achieved the team’s acoustics goals using broadband absorption ceiling panels and the RPG Acoustical Systems BAD Panels. “What makes these panels special is that in addition to providing absorption, they also can give you a bit of scattering as well,” he said. “This is very important since SRF has a broad range of programming, and it allowed us to establish different room ambiances for different production needs.”

 

SRF’s staff moved into the new facility as production neared completion, which allowed WSDG to receive direct feedback from the station’s engineering personnel to ensure that the rooms were calibrated perfectly to meet their needs. “We continued having conversations with the production staff once they moved into the rooms and began using them,” said Hersberger. “This allowed us to fine-tune the rooms in real-time, and give them the best possible working environment.”

 

All photos credited to Yohan Zerdoun.

Meret Oppenheim Hochhaus

Herzog & de Meuron as Architects

Site
SBB is one of Switzerland’s largest landowners. This national railway company owns land in prime locations of the urban centers across the country. This previously underutilized potential of real estate has been increasingly developed in the last years, thus contributing to the densification of urban centers around the main stations of Basel, Zurich, Lucerne and other cities. Such a densification and urban renewal project is the Meret Oppenheim Hochhaus, located in the Gundeldinger Quarter of Basel. The project is part of the Südpark ensemble. In 2002, Herzog & de Meuron won the competition for Südpark organized by SBB to develop two plots situated to the south of the main train station. Both plots are closely connected with the "Passerelle", an overhead walkway spanning the railroad tracks. Together, the Südpark (completed in 2012) and the Meret Oppenheim Hochhaus will form a new spatial context for future access to the station and to the city center of Basel. In addition, the two projects help to define the northern edge of the Gundeldinger Quarter. This densely populated area, known as the “Gundeli” amongst Baslers, has become a dynamic area of diversity and active street life.

photo_credit Robert Hösl
Robert Hösl

Stacking volumes
The form of the tower is the result of stacking volumes of different sizes. The process of stacking underwent various phases where we tested how the resulting proportions, dimensions and functions would fit with the urbanistic and programmatic expectations and requirements. The concept of stacking allows us to break down the scale of this unusually tall building at the edge of the large track field on one side, and facing the narrowness and the scale of the historic neighbourhood of “Gundeli” on the other side. The stacking of volumes generates a kind of topography of various terraces, platforms, gaps and other outdoor – indoor spaces. Its numerous setbacks and overhangs provide exclusive exterior spaces for a large number of apartments, amongst other programs.

photo_credit Robert Hösl
Robert Hösl

Programming volumes
The Meret Oppenheim Hochhaus is a mixed-use building with apartment, offices, a café and a restaurant. Most programs are bound to specific volumes within the whole stack. The café and the restaurant will animate the street life along the Güterstrasse and the Meret Oppenheim Square. Above the ground floor with its restaurant there will be 5 floors of office space. The residential portion of the building rises from the 6th to the 24rd floor. The apartments may be entered independently from the service functions. On the 6th, 7th, and 15th floors, there are large outdoor areas that will function as terraces for the respective apartments, or alternatively as communal outdoor gathering spaces for the offices. The different levels provide unique views over the city and the surrounding landscape.

photo_credit Adriano A. Biondo
Adriano A. Biondo

Façade
The shape of the tower is characterized by its strong volumetric structure. Through the principle of stacking volumes, overhangs, terraces, and voids between the individual sub-volumes are created. These elements give the building its specific appearance. A folding and sliding shutter system forms the outer shape and appearance of the building. Placed just behind these movable sun protection elements is a balcony layer that creates depth on all sides of the building. This transitional space introduces a filter between the individual residences and the city, allowing views from interior to exterior, and a shifting transparency from exterior to interior. The resulting depth of the facade is a central feature of the architectural design and gives the shell its quality and distinctive space.

photo_credit Adriano A. Biondo
Adriano A. Biondo

The appearance of the building is changing not only from different perspectives of the city, but also throughout the day and night. The building changes between a distinctive and precise assemblage of volumes and a more eroded and fuzzy appearance. This happens by its users and through external influences such as sunlight or wind. This constant change gives form to the individuality of its users/residents, while at the same time generating a dialogue with those viewing the building from the surrounding neighborhood.

photo_credit Adriano A. Biondo
Adriano A. Biondo
photo_credit Robert Hösl
Robert Hösl
photo_credit Robert Hösl
Robert Hösl
photo_credit Adriano A. Biondo
Adriano A. Biondo

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