Product Spec Sheet

ElementBrandProduct Name
Interior lightingFluxwerx
ManufacturersAccoya
ManufacturersAmerican Hydrotech
ManufacturersKawneer
ManufacturersMilliken
ManufacturersUSG Corporation

Product Spec Sheet
Interior lighting
Manufacturers
by Accoya
Manufacturers
Manufacturers
by Kawneer
Manufacturers
Manufacturers

The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design

The Miller Hull Partnership as Architects

Located in the heart of Atlanta, The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design at Georgia Tech was created to foster environmental education, research, and a public forum for community outreach. Designed by the collaboration of The Miller Hull Partnership, LLP and Lord Aeck Sargent Planning and Design, Inc (LAS), The Kendeda Building is the first Living Building of its kind in the Southeast United States, setting a new standard for sustainability.

photo_credit Jonathan Hillyer
Jonathan Hillyer

The Living Building Challenge (LBC) is the world’s most rigorous proven performance sustainability certification standard for buildings. A Full Certified Living Building needs to meet all 20 Imperatives of the Challenge, which are divided into seven Petals, or performance areas: Place, Water, Energy, Health + Happiness, Materials, Equity, and Beauty.  The design and construction of The Kendeda Building demonstrates that Living Buildings are possible in even the most challenging climates.

photo_credit Jonathan Hillyer
Jonathan Hillyer

The Pebble in the Pond
The Kendeda Building continues a decade of work by the Kendeda Fund to advance sustainability in Atlanta’s built environment. In addition to providing financial support for the project, the Kendeda Fund has provided ongoing funding to support programs in the building that engage local Atlanta communities beyond the university. The atrium, lecture hall, roof garden, and multipurpose room will all be made available for community events. Georgia Tech’s mission is to maximize the impact of the building by exposing as many students as possible to the project. Tech students move on to pursue careers at the highest levels around the globe. After learning in a building expressing such a strong position on resiliency and sustainability, they will take those values with them into their future endeavors as leaders in the STEM fields.

photo_credit Jonathan Hillyer
Jonathan Hillyer

The Regenerative Porch
The design of The Kendeda Building is inspired by the vernacular southern porch. The project reimagines this regionally ubiquitous architectural device for the civic scale of the campus. The Regenerative Porch performs the traditional tasks of creating a cool micro-climate around the building and blurring interior and exterior conditions. Additionally, the Porch is leveraged to satisfy the rigorous requirements of the Living Building Challenge. The PV canopy generates more than 100% of the building’s energy demand and captures enough rainwater to meet 100% of the water used in the building.

photo_credit Gregg Willett
Gregg Willett

Watershed Thinking
All of the water used in The Kendeda Building comes from rainwater captured by the Porch canopy. Treated rainwater is used for drinking fountains, sinks, and showers. The greywater generated from these fixtures is pumped to a constructed wetland at the building’s main entrance. This water then descends via gravity through a series of rain gardens and detention structures aligned with the tiered exterior terraces before infiltrating to the site. Georgia Tech currently incurs a significant expense to discharge stormwater to Atlanta’s over extended sewer system. The Kendeda Building demonstrates available strategies that could be deployed throughout the campus to manage stormwater more intelligently.

photo_credit Jonathan Hillyer
Jonathan Hillyer

More Wood, Less Carbon
The Kendeda Building is Georgia Tech’s first timber building since its earliest load bearing masonry and timber structures from the 1880s. Mass timber was selected for its significantly smaller embodied carbon footprint, compared to concrete and steel systems. Glue laminated queen post trusses with steel bottom chords are used to achieve the spans required by the larger spaces in the building where timber alone would be challenging. This hybrid approach reduces the quantity of wood required, while making routing of building services more efficient. The gravity and lateral elements are fully exposed, allowing the building to be a teaching tool and defining the character of the interior environment.

photo_credit Jonathan Hillyer
Jonathan Hillyer

The nail laminated wood decking was panelized off-site and craned into place. Twenty-five thousand linear feet of 2-by-4 material was salvaged from Atlanta’s Lifecycle Building Center, which sourced the lumber from discarded film sets. The decking was assembled by apprentices hired through local nonprofit Georgia Works!, providing valuable trade skills. Off-cuts from the new lumber were assembled into the seat steps that descend the three tiers of the atrium. In addition to the structural timber, wood salvaged from trees felled on campus was used for counter tops and furniture.

photo_credit Jonathan Hillyer
Jonathan Hillyer

Completed in 2019, The Kendeda Building’s true measure of its success will be the change it inspires in its own city of Atlanta and beyond. State-of-the-shelf technologies and products represent strategies that can be easily replicated by other institutions and even everyday homeowners. The facility received Full Living Building Certification in early 2021.

photo_credit Gregg Willett
Gregg Willett

"This is unlike any other project we have embarked upon here at Tech. It is more than an opportunity to create a one-of-a kind net positive facility in the Southeast. It is also an opportunity to learn how to leverage and integrate all of our resources to educate others."
- Steve Swant, executive vice president for Administration and Finance, Georgia Institute of Technology

photo_credit Gregg Willett
Gregg Willett

Materials

Roof:
● Heavy Timber
● Mass Timber
Glued laminated timber beams and columns with nail laminated wood decking. In areas with greater load or
longer spans a hybrid steel queen post truss with mass timber top chord supports the structural deck.
Alternating 2x4 and 2x6 lumber create a fluted finish surface on the decking.

Floor:
● Heavy Timber
● Mass Timber
Glued laminated timber beams and columns support nail laminated wood decking beneath a radiant concrete topping slab. In areas with greater load or longer spans a hybrid steel queen post truss with mass timber top chord supports the structural deck. Alternating 2x4 and 2x6 lumber create a fluted finish surface on the decking.

Finish wood products:
● Salvaged wood beams from the one of the oldest buildings on campus were used as stair treads.
● Acetylated wood exterior cladding.
● Trees felled on campus were used for counter tops.
● Off-cuts from the nail laminated decking were used in the atrium seat steps.
● The exposed nail laminated decking serves as a finished ceiling.
● The timber frame is exposed throughout the building.

The project uses salvaged wood and 100% FSC wood for any new lumber. FSC wood has significantly less embodied carbon and a greater carbon sequestration potential than non-certified wood because of its responsible forestry practices. Additional lumber was provided from salvage of nearby buildings as well as from storm-felled trees in Georgia.

Flexible, comfortable, high performance lighting selection

Fluxwerx as Interior lighting

In a region known for temperature extremes and humidity, The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design is one of 28 buildings worldwide and the first Living Building of its scale in the Southeastern United States to earn full certification under the rigorous green building standard, while also achieving LEED Platinum v4 level certification. Designed by the collaboration of The Miller Hull Partnership, LLP and Lord Aeck Sargent, The Kendeda Building sets a new standard for regenerative design.

photo_credit Jonathan Hillyer
Jonathan Hillyer

Located on the Georgia Institute of Technology campus in Atlanta, Georgia, the project’s goal was to advance green building and innovation in the Southeast, transforming the built environment. The 46,800-square-foot building includes classrooms, laboratories, offices, an auditorium, a student commons, and a roof garden with an apiary.

photo_credit Gregg Willett
Gregg Willett

Flexible, comfortable, high performance lighting selection was critical to complement and support the variety of collaborative and individual-led teaching and learning activities. Precision anidolic-extraction optics of selected View and Profile Spoke luminaires deliver exceptional uniformity on the desks in the classrooms and work surfaces of the science labs. 

photo_credit Gregg Willett
Gregg Willett

The open atrium space required careful consideration of lighting design to deliver multi-functional glare-free illuminance while staying energy code compliant and seamlessly integrating into the surroundings. Designed to receive an abundance of daylight, the atrium acts as a central hub of the building. Discreetly complementing the striking geometry of the interior, Fluxwerx pendant and linear suspended luminaires blend with the architecture to deliver a balance of functionality, minimalist design, and operative savings. 

photo_credit Gregg Willett
Gregg Willett

Because daylight harvesting was also a large energy saving and biophilic goal of the project, the team needed lights that would not obstruct daylight or be a visual challenge when they were off during daylight hours. As Fluxwerx View fixtures are essentially transparent when not in use, they can recede and allow the windows to do their job fully.

photo_credit Gregg Willett
Gregg Willett

We were able to create a project with an LDP (lighting power density) of about .4 w/sf using the View fixtures. This level of performance is significantly better—by about 50%—than code. The View fixtures delivered up/down lighting as well, allowing the rooms to be evenly lit and provide illumination where we needed it.

– JOSHUA R GRASSMAN, RA, LEED BD&C, SUSTAINABLE DESIGN DIRECTOR, LORD AECK SARGENT 

photo_credit Gregg Willett
Gregg Willett

The Living Building Challenge is organized around seven “Petals,” which include Place, Water, Energy, Health and Happiness, Materials, Equity, and Beauty. The Materials Petal in the Living Building Challenge required the project team to screen out materials that include “Red List” chemicals. To meet the project’s ambitious goals of Net Positive Energy and removal of Red List chemicals, Lord Aeck Sargent design team looked to Fluxwerx to help provide lighting solutions that were efficient, beautiful and red list free.

photo_credit Jonathan Hillyer
Gregg Willett

In the International Living Future Institute’s own words The Living Building Challenge, “is a philosophy, certification, and advocacy tool for projects to move beyond merely being less bad and to become truly regenerative.” LEED and the Living Building Challenge represent rungs on a ladder leading to regenerative design.  By pursuing both certifications simultaneously, The Kendeda Building serves as a living laboratory and a showcase for an optimized integration of light, design and humanity for both design and student communities.

 

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